Shoot Interview With Disco Stu, Part One

Ladies and Gentlemen I’m sitting here with Lawrence Tucker, but many of you know him as Disco Stu. How are you doing this morning?

Dean Martin once said I feel sorry for people who don’t drink because when they wake up that’s the best they are going to feel all day. Pretend I’m Dean Martin right now.

I wouldn’t say I’m feeling like Dean after a Vegas show, but I’m doing fine. And thanks for taking time for this interview.

Tell me at what age did you discover professional wrestling and what drew you to it?

I started watching WWF on Sunday mornings about the age of 7 (1986). I loved the characters, the characters always brought me in more than the work rate as a kid, like I’m sure many kids felt. I wasn’t even that big of a Hogan guy, loved steamboat and Jake.

Growing up did it ever cross your mind to become a pro wrestler?

Absolutely not. I was the kid who was skinnier than Screech. I could go to McDonald’s and eat 3 double cheeseburgers and lose 5 pounds in the process.

As for the character Disco Stu how did that gimmick come about? And if I may ask, is Stu related to Disco Inferno?

I was always a huge Simpson’s fan. My license plate has been DSCOSTU since I was 16 so when it came time to pick a gimmick for me it was obvious.

In the mid to late nineties WWF(E) and WCW were feuding in the ‪Monday Night‬ Wars, around that same time an indie promotion called FUW was making waves in locale territories. How did you become part of that promotion?

When I was a kid in school I would book shows in class instead of paying attention. I would pretend WCW and WWF were all one and I would write out story lines on feuds like the Steiners vs. Rockers. In early 98 a group of my friends would meet at Denny’s every Monday after Raw/Nitro to talk about it. We would print out “dirt sheets” and discuss rumors. A friend of mine was a film school drop out as was I so we discussed one night about filming a show we would write. So a week later six of us filmed the long lost FUW house show in my girlfriends parents attic and used flip in fucks as the ring. It was horrible but the word got out so a month later we did our first back yard show. It kept snowballing until Illinois State University got a hold of our tapes and offered us a paying gig.

Have you had any professional training to become a wrestler?

I didn’t but as FUW evolved we rented warehouses and created training facilities: crash pads for wrestlers. By that time I was barely a wrestler but was really proud of our guys who put in the work and taught each other how to work.

You also became the first FUW World Heavyweight Champion, what did that mean to you?

Honestly not much. There were two co-founders myself and another guy. We agreed I would win the first title match in a trampoline lumberjack match and if we had another show he would defeat me. I never expected to have another show. Three years later I was part of a team that won the tag belts and that meant a lot because I get we had a great match and gave the fans what they wanted.

In the match you had with Mad Dawg were you had a VHS tape on a pole, who’s idea was that?

So that show was supposed to be our last but much like Terry Funk we came back. It was actually the first show I didn’t book or help with creative which actually hurt me a lot because I wasn’t a part of it in any way. It was supposed to be our last show but I felt like I wasn’t needed at all. I was planning on not participating at all but the wrestler I managed XXX got injured so the “porn on a pole” match was in jeopardy. I hadn’t told anyone that I wasn’t going to be at the show but I had to fill in for him last minute and wrestle. The programs had been printed with the match so I stepped in to replace him.

You and Honky Tonk Rob formed a tag team called, Rhythm and Funk. Do you prefer being in a tag team or going solo as a single star?

I like being in a tag team. As I stated earlier my work rate was sub par so that allowed me to get my spots in, pop the crowd and let my partner work as well.

Memories from the tag match where you defeated Luke A Libre for the tag team belts?

Ha, well the joke there is that I received a concussion due to a rope break in which I got dumped on my head so memories from the actual match are not there. I have watched that match a 100 times so I know it move for move. The match online that is out there I believe is edited so there is more too it than you may have seen. My favorite memory though was working with Luke A Libre. Those guys were a lot of fun and the crowd was really really into the story our match told.

Winning the FUW World Heavyweight Championship didn’t mean much in your eyes, but you did go on to hold the Tag Team Championships did winning those belts mean anything?

In wresting titles are often called “props” I personally don’t believe that normally. I think that if the right people are holding a Feds titles it should elevate the shows they defend them on. However I was also the booker a lot of the time so it’s easy to say that the booker put the title on himself to get over. I don’t believe that was the case and we didn’t hold them long but if I’m being completely honest, hell yes it felt good and hell yes it meant something to be. I am proud of that match we won them at and I am proud to say I held the tag titles in my little tiny Indy fed.

Look for part two of this shoot interview in the up coming weeks. Massive!

One thought on “Shoot Interview With Disco Stu, Part One”

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